Menu
Home Page

Broadhempston Village Primary School

Science

Science Curriculum Rationale

 

At Broadhempston Village Primary School we are scientists! We want our children to develop a love and passion for science. We want them to live life without limits, by following their dreams and ambitions, to one day become astronauts, forensic scientists, zoologists or microbiologists. We want them to embody our school core values. The science curriculum has been carefully crafted so that our children develop their scientific capital. We want our children to remember their science lessons in our school, to look back on  these memories fondly and embrace the scientific opportunities they are presented with throughout their lives.

 

Curriculum Intent

 

At Broadhempston Village Primary School we believe Science should nurture children’s natural curiosity, develop their understanding of the world and teach them essential enquiry skills. We are committed to ensuring all children are inspired to develop their Science Capital to become Scientists of the future as they build their understanding of the value and place Science has in their everyday lives. As one of the core subjects taught in primary schools, we give the teaching and learning of Science the prominence it requires.

 

Through our teaching of Science we aim to increase pupils’ knowledge and understanding of our world and develop the skills associated with Science as a process of enquiry. Through Science we will develop the natural curiosity of the child, encourage respect for living organisms and the physical environment and provide opportunities for critical evaluation of evidence.

 

At Broadhempston Village Primary School, in conjunction with the aims of the National Curriculum, our Science teaching aims to:

 

  • stimulate and excite pupils’ curiosity about natural phenomena and events in the world around them.

  • support this curiosity with the teaching of scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding

    through an investigative and practical approach to the specific disciplines of Biology, Chemistry and

    Physics;

  • develop understanding of the nature, processes and methods of Science through different types of

    science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them;

  • develop pupils’ understanding of how major scientific ideas contribute toward technological change

    that impact locally and globally and become equipped with the scientific knowledge required to

    understand the uses and implications of Science, today and for the future;

  • develop the essential scientific enquiry skills to deepen their scientific knowledge through a

    progressive curriculum.

  • use a range of methods to communicate their scientific information and present it in a systematic,

    scientific manner, including I.C.T., diagrams, graphs and charts;

  • develop a respect for the materials and equipment they handle with regard to their own, and other

    children’s safety;

  • learn to question, discuss and act on science based issues that may affect their own lives, the

    directions of society and current global sustainability;

  • support children in developing a lifelong love of scientific learning, discovery and a skill set required

    to do so.

 

Implementation of Science

 

At Broadhempston Village Primary School our vision is to go beyond just delivering the National Curriculum Aims by providing our children with a 5 Star Science Curriculum. This involves developing their Science Capital, making them global citizens by showing them the importance of Science in the wider world and developing their sense of self in the impacts their actions have on the planet. As part of their primary education in Science pupils will have the opportunity to experience:

 

  • Meeting a Scientist through the STEM Ambassador program.
  • Taking part in a Science focused inspirational trip to develop their understanding of Science in the wider world.
  • Having the opportunity to explore and fully engage with nature through Science lessons and Forest School.
  • Taking part in a National Nature Survey such as the Big Bug Hunt, The Big Bird Watch, Devon Horseshoe Bat project to increase their understanding of biodiversity and the threats it faces.
  • Through use of the Practical Action resources, engage with the global sustainability goals of food, water, climate, recycling and energy to be able to understand their impact on the planet and the implications for future generations enabling them to take action.

 

As Scientists, children at Broadhempston Village Primary School experience the 5 Star Science Curriculum as outlined above. Children have weekly lessons in Science throughout Key Stage 1 and 2 and this is planned by their teacher, with input for our Science Subject Lead, using either a 2 year rolling programme (Class 1 and 2) or a 3 year rolling programme (Class 3 and 4) to ensure complete curriculum coverage. At our school Science is taught as a discreet subject but staff make meaningful links across subjects. Example: we use maths for sample distribution in which we use data tables and graphing in order to compare and contrast scientific results, as well as using measuring equipment. Within English lessons we have also completed a sequence on 'Women in Science' a book by Rachel Ignotofsky in order to develop passion for the subject in all children. Science is a progressive subject at our school and in light of this we ensure we build upon and link the learning and skills taught in previous years when planning and teaching future topics. As the children’s knowledge and understanding increases, and they become more proficient in selecting, using scientific equipment, collating and interpreting results, they become increasingly confident in their growing ability to come to conclusions based on real evidence.

In Early years, science allows our children to explore the world around by learning through play. A positive and encouraging classroom environment can be found across all Key Stages. Children’s questions are always welcomed and they are given the opportunity to explore new ideas as well as test them. They are provided with problem solving opportunities that allow them to find out for themselves by asking their own questions and given opportunities to use their scientific skills and research to discover the answers. This curiosity is celebrated within the classroom. Working Scientifically skills are embedded into lessons, taught alongside the knowledge objectives to ensure these skills are being developed throughout the each child's education and new vocabulary and challenging concepts are introduced through direct teaching. This is developed through the years, in-keeping with the topics.
In order to provide suitable learning opportunities for all children, teachers ensure that they use a variety of strategies to accommodate different learning styles.

 

Impact of Science

 

The successful approach at Broadhempston Village Primary School results in a fun, engaging, high-quality Science education, that provides children with the skills and foundations for understanding the world in which they live. Our engagement with the local environment through Forest School and National Surveys ensures that children learn through varied and first hand experiences of the world around them. Using the Practical Action resources, children are able to link the Science directly to global issues and develop a deeper understanding of how Science is vital in developing solutions to problems that affect people’s everyday lives. Through engagement with Stem Ambassadors, children are increasing their Science Capital and seeing possibilities for careers in Science. Workshops, trips and the interactions with experts they meet along their scientific journey provide every child with information to help them to see the bigger picture and how Science has a role to play in our everyday lives. Pupil voice is used to further develop the Science curriculum, through questioning of pupils’ views and attitudes to Science to support the children’s enjoyment and ownership of Science and to motivate their learning.

 

We use both formative and summative assessment information in every science lesson. Staff use this information to inform their short-term planning and short-term interventions. This helps us provide the best possible support for all of our pupils, including the more able. The assessment milestones for each phase have been carefully mapped out and further broken down for each year group. This means that skills in science are progressive and build year on year. 

 

Our staff use science formative assessment grids, within SIMS, to systematically assess what the children know as the topic progresses and inform their future planning. These formative assessment grids then inform summative assessment judgements for each topic.

Summative assessment information is collected 3 times a year (Autumn, Spring and Summer Term) and analysed as part of our monitoring cycle. This process provides an accurate and comprehensive understanding of the quality of education in science. A comprehensive monitoring cycle is developed at the beginning of each academic year. This identifies when monitoring is undertaken. Monitoring in science includes: book scrutinies, lesson observations and/or learning walks, pupil/parent and/or staff voice.

 

During Academy Science hub meetings, individual pupil work is moderated to ensure judgments are accurate and that resources/sound practice are shared.

 

All of this information is gathered and reviewed. It is used to inform further curriculum developments and provision is adapted accordingly.

 

At Broadhempston Village Primary School we are SCIENTISTS!!

 

How is Science monitored across the Academy?

 

Within The Link Academy Trust we have developed 'The Science Leadership Curriculum Group' (CLG) this is lead by a Chairperson (Mrs J Lunt - Harbertonford Primary School) and supported by an Academy Head (Mr D Turner - Broadhempston Village Primary School).

 

The group meets online each term and has the following duties:

 

  • The CLG is responsible for the review of Science policies to prepare them for review by Local Boards, S&C Committee and the Board of Directors.

  • The CLG is run professionally with a Chair and Vice Chair. There is a clear agenda and minutes which are agreed at the following meetings and agreed actions that will be reviews and developed.

  • The CLG will ensure current thinking, research and National Agendas and developments relating to the subject area are shared and any Action Plans are in place to improve practice in line with these agendas.

  • The CLG will ensure schools offer an effective Science curriculum for all with clear documentation, procedures and protocols are in place to ensure the highest outcomes for every child are achieved.
  • The CLG will arrange opportunities to moderate judgments and hone practice across the Trust, using monitoring as a tool, where this is appropriate and focusing on consistent and effective assessment and the development of challenge.

  • Action Plans will be drawn up following external inspection to lead improvements and these recommendations are shared and progress is supported.

  • All CLG will consider the new Ofsted Framework to ensure Intent, Implementation and Impact is fully explored and agreed actions improve teaching and learning further.

  • The CLG will be responsible for developing good lines of communication through emails, Microsoft Teams, document drops to develop high quality and consistent practice.

  • The CLG will ensure that subject skills, understanding and related vocabulary are taught within the overall enquiry based topic where learning connections are fostered.

  • The CLG share resources through Microsoft Teams to ensure high Quality First Teaching.
    In each school the Science Co-ordinator is responsible for ensuring that the aims of the Science Policy

    are met. In addition to this, the Science Co-ordinator should:-

  • Ensure the 5 Star Science Curriculum is implemented and monitored.

  • Be enthusiastic about Science and demonstrate good practice.

  • Attend Science Hub meetings and feed information back to their own schools during staff meeting time.

  • Encourage and support staff in the implementation of the curriculum and school approaches to Science teaching

  • Co-ordinate assessment procedures and record keeping to ensure progression and development throughout the school

  • Monitor the teaching and learning of Science throughout the school.

  • Organise and review all Science-based resources, ensuring they are readily available and maintained.

  • Support staff by encouraging the sharing of ideas and organising in-service training as appropriate.

  • Attend the Science moderation meeting to ensure accurate and consistent assessment across Link Academy Trust schools.

 

Science programmes of study: Key Stages 1 and 2

 

Purpose of study

 

A high-quality science education provides the foundations for understanding the world through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics. Science has changed our lives and is vital to the world’s future prosperity, and all pupils should be taught essential aspects of the knowledge, methods, processes and uses of science. Through building up a body of key foundational knowledge and concepts, pupils should be encouraged to recognise the power of rational explanation and develop a sense of excitement and curiosity about natural phenomena. They should be encouraged to understand how science can be used to explain what is occurring, predict how things will behave, and analyse causes.

 

Aims

 

The national curriculum for science aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • develop scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics
  • develop understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science through different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them
  • are equipped with the scientific knowledge required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and for the future

 

Scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding

 

The programmes of study describe a sequence of knowledge and concepts. While it is important that pupils make progress, it is also vitally important that they develop secure understanding of each key block of knowledge and concepts in order to progress to the next stage. Insecure, superficial understanding will not allow genuine progression: pupils may struggle at key points of transition (such as between primary and secondary school), build up serious misconceptions, and/or have significant difficulties in understanding higher-order content.

Pupils should be able to describe associated processes and key characteristics in common language, but they should also be familiar with, and use, technical terminology accurately and precisely. They should build up an extended specialist vocabulary. They should also apply their mathematical knowledge to their understanding of science, including collecting, presenting and analysing data. The social and economic implications of science are important but, generally, they are taught most appropriately within the wider school curriculum: teachers will wish to use different contexts to maximise their pupils’ engagement with and motivation to study science.

 

The nature, processes and methods of science

 

‘Working scientifically’ specifies the understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science for each year group. It should not be taught as a separate strand. The notes and guidance give examples of how ‘working scientifically’ might be embedded within the content of biology, chemistry and physics, focusing on the key features of scientific enquiry, so that pupils learn to use a variety of approaches to answer relevant scientific questions. These types of scientific enquiry should include: observing over time; pattern seeking; identifying, classifying and grouping; comparative and fair testing (controlled investigations); and researching using secondary sources. Pupils should seek answers to questions through collecting, analysing and presenting data. ‘Working scientifically’ will be developed further at key stages 3 and 4, once pupils have built up sufficient understanding of science to engage meaningfully in more sophisticated discussion of experimental design and control.

 

Spoken language

 

The national curriculum for science reflects the importance of spoken language in pupils’ development across the whole curriculum – cognitively, socially and linguistically. The quality and variety of language that pupils hear and speak are key factors in developing their scientific vocabulary and articulating scientific concepts clearly and precisely. They must be assisted in making their thinking clear, both to themselves and others, and teachers should ensure that pupils build secure foundations by using discussion to probe and remedy their misconceptions.

 

School curriculum

 

The programmes of study for science are set out year-by-year for key stages 1 and 2. Schools are, however, only required to teach the relevant programme of study by the end of the key stage. Within each key stage, schools therefore have the flexibility to introduce content earlier or later than set out in the programme of study. In addition, schools can introduce key stage content during an earlier key stage if appropriate. All schools are also required to set out their school curriculum for science on a year-by-year basis and make this information available online.

 

Attainment targets

 

By the end of each key stage, pupils are expected to know, apply and understand the matters, skills and processes specified in the relevant programme of study.

 

Key stage 1

 

The principal focus of science teaching in key stage 1 is to enable pupils to experience and observe phenomena, looking more closely at the natural and humanly constructed world around them. They should be encouraged to be curious and ask questions about what they notice. They should be helped to develop their understanding of scientific ideas by using different types of scientific enquiry to answer their own questions, including observing changes over a period of time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out simple comparative tests, and finding things out using secondary sources of information. They should begin to use simple scientific language to talk about what they have found out and communicate their ideas to a range of audiences in a variety of ways. Most of the learning about science should be done through the use of first-hand practical experiences, but there should also be some use of appropriate secondary sources, such as books, photographs and videos.

‘Working scientifically’ is described separately in the programme of study, but must always be taught through and clearly related to the teaching of substantive science content in the programme of study. Throughout the notes and guidance, examples show how scientific methods and skills might be linked to specific elements of the content.

Pupils should read and spell scientific vocabulary at a level consistent with their increasing word-reading and spelling knowledge at key stage 1.

 

Key stage 1 programme of study – Years 1 and 2

 

Working scientifically

 

During years 1 and 2, pupils should be taught to use the following practical scientific methods, processes and skills through the teaching of the programme of study content:

  • asking simple questions and recognising that they can be answered in different ways
  • observing closely, using simple equipment
  • performing simple tests
  • identifying and classifying
  • using their observations and ideas to suggest answers to questions
  • gathering and recording data to help in answering questions

 

Year 1 programme of study

 

Plants

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify and name a variety of common wild and garden plants, including deciduous and evergreen trees
  • identify and describe the basic structure of a variety of common flowering plants, including trees

 

Animals, including humans

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify and name a variety of common animals including fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals
  • identify and name a variety of common animals that are carnivores, herbivores and omnivores
  • describe and compare the structure of a variety of common animals (fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals including pets)
  • identify, name, draw and label the basic parts of the human body and say which part of the body is associated with each sense

 

Everyday materials

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • distinguish between an object and the material from which it is made
  • identify and name a variety of everyday materials, including wood, plastic, glass, metal, water, and rock
  • describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday materials
  • compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of their simple physical properties

 

Seasonal changes

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • observe changes across the 4 seasons
  • observe and describe weather associated with the seasons and how day length varies

 

Year 2 programme of study

 

Living things and their habitats

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • explore and compare the differences between things that are living, dead, and things that have never been alive
  • identify that most living things live in habitats to which they are suited and describe how different habitats provide for the basic needs of different kinds of animals and plants, and how they depend on each other
  • identify and name a variety of plants and animals in their habitats, including microhabitats
  • describe how animals obtain their food from plants and other animals, using the idea of a simple food chain, and identify and name different sources of food

 

Plants

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • observe and describe how seeds and bulbs grow into mature plants
  • find out and describe how plants need water, light and a suitable temperature to grow and stay healthy

 

Animals, including humans

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • notice that animals, including humans, have offspring which grow into adults
  • find out about and describe the basic needs of animals, including humans, for survival (water, food and air)
  • describe the importance for humans of exercise, eating the right amounts of different types of food, and hygiene

 

Uses of everyday materials

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal, plastic, glass, brick, rock, paper and cardboard for particular uses
  • find out how the shapes of solid objects made from some materials can be changed by squashing, bending, twisting and stretching

 

Lower key stage 2 – Years 3 and 4

 

The principal focus of science teaching in lower key stage 2 is to enable pupils to broaden their scientific view of the world around them. They should do this through exploring, talking about, testing and developing ideas about everyday phenomena and the relationships between living things and familiar environments, and by beginning to develop their ideas about functions, relationships and interactions. They should ask their own questions about what they observe and make some decisions about which types of scientific enquiry are likely to be the best ways of answering them, including observing changes over time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out simple comparative and fair tests and finding things out using secondary sources of information. They should draw simple conclusions and use some scientific language, first, to talk about and, later, to write about what they have found out.

‘Working scientifically’ is described separately at the beginning of the programme of study, but must always be taught through and clearly related to substantive science content in the programme of study. Throughout the notes and guidance, examples show how scientific methods and skills might be linked to specific elements of the content.

Pupils should read and spell scientific vocabulary correctly and with confidence, using their growing word-reading and spelling knowledge.

 

Lower key stage 2 programme of study

 

Working scientifically

 

During years 3 and 4, pupils should be taught to use the following practical scientific methods, processes and skills through the teaching of the programme of study content:

  • asking relevant questions and using different types of scientific enquiries to answer them
  • setting up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests
  • making systematic and careful observations and, where appropriate, taking accurate measurements using standard units, using a range of equipment, including thermometers and data loggers
  • gathering, recording, classifying and presenting data in a variety of ways to help in answering questions
  • recording findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts, and tables
  • reporting on findings from enquiries, including oral and written explanations, displays or presentations of results and conclusions
  • using results to draw simple conclusions, make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions
  • identifying differences, similarities or changes related to simple scientific ideas and processes
  • using straightforward scientific evidence to answer questions or to support their findings.

 

Year 3 programme of study

 

Plants

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify and describe the functions of different parts of flowering plants: roots, stem/trunk, leaves and flowers
  • explore the requirements of plants for life and growth (air, light, water, nutrients from soil, and room to grow) and how they vary from plant to plant
  • investigate the way in which water is transported within plants
  • explore the part that flowers play in the life cycle of flowering plants, including pollination, seed formation and seed dispersal

 

Animals, including humans

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify that animals, including humans, need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat
  • identify that humans and some other animals have skeletons and muscles for support, protection and movement

 

Rocks

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • compare and group together different kinds of rocks on the basis of their appearance and simple physical properties
  • describe in simple terms how fossils are formed when things that have lived are trapped within rock
  • recognise that soils are made from rocks and organic matter

 

Light

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • recognise that they need light in order to see things and that dark is the absence of light
  • notice that light is reflected from surfaces
  • recognise that light from the sun can be dangerous and that there are ways to protect their eyes
  • recognise that shadows are formed when the light from a light source is blocked by an opaque object
  • find patterns in the way that the size of shadows change

 

Forces and magnets

 

  • compare how things move on different surfaces
  • notice that some forces need contact between 2 objects, but magnetic forces can act at a distance
  • observe how magnets attract or repel each other and attract some materials and not others
  • compare and group together a variety of everyday materials on the basis of whether they are attracted to a magnet, and identify some magnetic materials
  • describe magnets as having 2 poles
  • predict whether 2 magnets will attract or repel each other, depending on which poles are facing

 

Year 4 programme of study

 

Living things and their habitats

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • recognise that living things can be grouped in a variety of ways
  • explore and use classification keys to help group, identify and name a variety of living things in their local and wider environment
  • recognise that environments can change and that this can sometimes pose dangers to living things

 

Animals, including humans

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • describe the simple functions of the basic parts of the digestive system in humans
  • identify the different types of teeth in humans and their simple functions
  • construct and interpret a variety of food chains, identifying producers, predators and prey

 

States of matter

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • compare and group materials together, according to whether they are solids, liquids or gases
  • observe that some materials change state when they are heated or cooled, and measure or research the temperature at which this happens in degrees Celsius (°C)
  • identify the part played by evaporation and condensation in the water cycle and associate the rate of evaporation with temperature

 

Sound

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify how sounds are made, associating some of them with something vibrating
  • recognise that vibrations from sounds travel through a medium to the ear
  • find patterns between the pitch of a sound and features of the object that produced it
  • find patterns between the volume of a sound and the strength of the vibrations that produced it
  • recognise that sounds get fainter as the distance from the sound source increases

 

Electricity

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify common appliances that run on electricity
  • construct a simple series electrical circuit, identifying and naming its basic parts, including cells, wires, bulbs, switches and buzzers
  • identify whether or not a lamp will light in a simple series circuit, based on whether or not the lamp is part of a complete loop with a battery
  • recognise that a switch opens and closes a circuit and associate this with whether or not a lamp lights in a simple series circuit
  • recognise some common conductors and insulators, and associate metals with being good conductors

 

Upper key stage 2 – Years 5 and 6

 

The principal focus of science teaching in upper key stage 2 is to enable pupils to develop a deeper understanding of a wide range of scientific ideas. They should do this through exploring and talking about their ideas; asking their own questions about scientific phenomena; and analysing functions, relationships and interactions more systematically. At upper key stage 2, they should encounter more abstract ideas and begin to recognise how these ideas help them to understand and predict how the world operates. They should also begin to recognise that scientific ideas change and develop over time. They should select the most appropriate ways to answer science questions using different types of scientific enquiry, including observing changes over different periods of time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out comparative and fair tests and finding things out using a wide range of secondary sources of information. Pupils should draw conclusions based on their data and observations, use evidence to justify their ideas, and use their scientific knowledge and understanding to explain their findings.

‘Working and thinking scientifically’ is described separately at the beginning of the programme of study, but must always be taught through and clearly related to substantive science content in the programme of study. Throughout the notes and guidance, examples show how scientific methods and skills might be linked to specific elements of the content.

Pupils should read, spell and pronounce scientific vocabulary correctly.

 

Upper key stage 2 programme of study

 

Working scientifically

 

During years 5 and 6, pupils should be taught to use the following practical scientific methods, processes and skills through the teaching of the programme of study content:

  • planning different types of scientific enquiries to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary
  • taking measurements, using a range of scientific equipment, with increasing accuracy and precision, taking repeat readings when appropriate
  • recording data and results of increasing complexity using scientific diagrams and labels, classification keys, tables, scatter graphs, bar and line graphs
  • using test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests
  • reporting and presenting findings from enquiries, including conclusions, causal relationships and explanations of and a degree of trust in results, in oral and written forms such as displays and other presentations
  • identifying scientific evidence that has been used to support or refute ideas or arguments

 

Year 5 programme of study

 

Living things and their habitats

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • describe the differences in the life cycles of a mammal, an amphibian, an insect and a bird
  • describe the life process of reproduction in some plants and animals

 

Animals, including humans

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • describe the changes as humans develop to old age

 

Properties and changes of materials

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • compare and group together everyday materials on the basis of their properties, including their hardness, solubility, transparency, conductivity (electrical and thermal), and response to magnets
  • know that some materials will dissolve in liquid to form a solution, and describe how to recover a substance from a solution
  • use knowledge of solids, liquids and gases to decide how mixtures might be separated, including through filtering, sieving and evaporating
  • give reasons, based on evidence from comparative and fair tests, for the particular uses of everyday materials, including metals, wood and plastic
  • demonstrate that dissolving, mixing and changes of state are reversible changes
  • explain that some changes result in the formation of new materials, and that this kind of change is not usually reversible, including changes associated with burning and the action of acid on bicarbonate of soda

 

Earth and space

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • describe the movement of the Earth and other planets relative to the sun in the solar system
  • describe the movement of the moon relative to the Earth
  • describe the sun, Earth and moon as approximately spherical bodies
  • use the idea of the Earth’s rotation to explain day and night and the apparent movement of the sun across the sky

 

Forces

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • explain that unsupported objects fall towards the Earth because of the force of gravity acting between the Earth and the falling object
  • identify the effects of air resistance, water resistance and friction, that act between moving surfaces
  • recognise that some mechanisms including levers, pulleys and gears allow a smaller force to have a greater effect

 

Year 6 programme of study

 

Living things and their habitats

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • describe how living things are classified into broad groups according to common observable characteristics and based on similarities and differences, including micro-organisms, plants and animals
  • give reasons for classifying plants and animals based on specific characteristics

 

Animals including humans

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • identify and name the main parts of the human circulatory system, and describe the functions of the heart, blood vessels and blood
  • recognise the impact of diet, exercise, drugs and lifestyle on the way their bodies function
  • describe the ways in which nutrients and water are transported within animals, including humans

 

Evolution and inheritance

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • recognise that living things have changed over time and that fossils provide information about living things that inhabited the Earth millions of years ago
  • recognise that living things produce offspring of the same kind, but normally offspring vary and are not identical to their parents
  • identify how animals and plants are adapted to suit their environment in different ways and that adaptation may lead to evolution

 

Light

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • recognise that light appears to travel in straight lines
  • use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain that objects are seen because they give out or reflect light into the eye
  • explain that we see things because light travels from light sources to our eyes or from light sources to objects and then to our eyes
  • use the idea that light travels in straight lines to explain why shadows have the same shape as the objects that cast them

 

Electricity

 

Pupils should be taught to:

  • associate the brightness of a lamp or the volume of a buzzer with the number and voltage of cells used in the circuit
  • compare and give reasons for variations in how components function, including the brightness of bulbs, the loudness of buzzers and the on/off position of switches
  • use recognised symbols when representing a simple circuit in a diagram
Top